California Assembly Bill 1116, formerly called the Critical incident Stress Management Services Act, has passed the state assembly and is on its way to the Senate. If it becomes law, the act would protect the confidentiality of public safety peer support team interactions except in the case of criminal proceedings. To be covered, team members would have to have completed a peer support training course to be developed by the Office of Emergency Services, the California Firefighter Joint Apprenticeship Committee or the Commission on Correctional Peace Officer Standards and Training.

This legislation would not give the level of protection that a therapist or ordained clergy has, but it will raise the bar considerably – unlike states that have passed similar laws, peer support and CISM teams in California currently have no protection against being subpoenaed. However, in the context of non-criminal proceedings, the legal “privilege” would be the same as between a psychotherapist and patient. The only exception would be “gross negligence or intentional misconduct.”

All of the components of a CISM program along with grief support and substance abuse are named as topics the law would cover.

The bill includes the phrase “toxic stress,” which I believe we should strike from our vocabulary. Stress can be toxic, but it doesn’t have to be, and the phrase “toxic stress” carries a strong connotation that all stress is toxic. That can be a self-fulfilling expectation – if you think stress is toxic, it probably will be.

This is a great step forward for California. I would have preferred that the state also recognize ICISF-approved training, rather than only requiring new courses, but “peer support” covers more than ICISF encompasses, so it is understandable.

If you’re in California, urge your senator to vote in favor. Let’s get the law in place, develop the classes and take the training.